Mt Amos, a rocky outcrop, juts sharply out from scrubby bushes. White streaks are formed naturally by water running down the rocks over time.

Mt Amos, Freycinet National Park

There isn't much to specifically describe the track by other than 'steep rock scramble', it is marked with some permanent light reflective yellow arrows, and some faded spray painted arrows. Occasionally the arrows suggest that some sections have separate paths for people travelling up, and for people travelling down. It is, otherwise, a fairly lawless place, at least as far as navigation is concerned. There are 3 distinctly difficult sections that will have you questioning every decision you made that brought you to the moment you find yourself in now. These feelings will pass (at least until you have to attempt those same sections in reverse).

Spiced Plum Fruit Leather

Summer means stone fruits and stone fruits have no chill. If you've found yourself in a fruit glut situation then do not panic. Make fruit leather and carry on. A friend gave me both green and purple gages, but the recipe works with any rich flavoured stone fruit Ingredients 1kg plums (or greengages) 2-3 Tbsp… Continue reading Spiced Plum Fruit Leather

Sentinel ranges

Sentinel Range

The path hugs the pink quartzite cliff-face for the entire ascent. We were walking in the wetter season and found that there was an almost constant freshwater drip over the cliff and onto our heads. As we were very hot this was a welcome relief, although it did add a certain slip-factor to some of the stones underfoot and we both found ourselves grateful for our hiking poles.

The sign which marks the start of the walk. It reads "highest point on road. 651m annual rain fall. 190cm" The rocky spires that make up the needles are foreboding in the background, cast in shadow.

The Needles (Mt Mueller); Southwest National Park

The Needles is an unsigned, wild walking trail best suited to those with experience. The track is only marked with cairns and plastic ribbon which adds to the sense of wilderness. It is the perfect way to dip your toe in the Southwest National Park and learn what some of the bigger walks might have in store.

Collins Cap: Wellington National Park

Sapphire, almost at the top Where we went: Collins Cap (Wellington National Park)When we went: Winter 2020Estimated time for hike: 3.5 hoursTime spent on hike: 4.5 hours (took an unplanned detour and a very long break, also sustained a minor injury)Grade of hike: 3 Collins Cap, located within the Wellington National Park is best accessed… Continue reading Collins Cap: Wellington National Park

Wellington Park: Wellington Falls via Disappearing Tarn

Where we went: Disappearing Tarn (Kunanyi/Wellington Park) When we went: Mid-winter 2020 Estimated time to complete walk: 6 hours (3 if you only go to the Tarn) Time spent on walk: 6 hours Humans, in general, are obsessed with the weather, and Tasmanians doubly so. It is the great force that connects us all through… Continue reading Wellington Park: Wellington Falls via Disappearing Tarn